Critical thinking rubrics high school


Description

Comfortably takes risks, tolerates ambiguity, learns from mistakes, and displays a willingness to grow. Consistently perseveres in exploring ideas when encountering moments of failure or constructive criticism; shows resilience in situations in which failure is part of the experience. Frequently stops exploring ideas when encountering moments of failure or constructive criticism. Has an unclear vision of the end product or performance.

Frequently uses a single, inflexible method for producing products. Usually perseveres in exploring ideas when encountering moments of failure or constructive criticism. Has a vision of the end product or performance.

Is beginning to display resilience when confronted with production challenges or setbacks, but sometimes lacks confidence and ability to take calculated risks and adapt plans. Has a clear vision of the end product or performance. Displays sufficient resilience when confronted with production challenges or setbacks; is confident and able to take calculated risks and adapt plans. Works collaboratively with others. Student initiates collaborative, creative activities or challenges; frequently acts as an "idea leader" in activities.

Somewhat effectively, shapes original ideas into a product in an effort to meet specifications. Presents a product that is considered to be somewhat valuable and unique by the broad, target audience and is considered by experts to be somewhat creative. Effectively shapes original ideas into a product in an effort to meet specifications. Presents a product that is considered to be valuable and unique by the broad, target audience and is considered by experts to be creative.

Proposes a product that has a vague or incomplete connection to the task. Product is not considered to be valuable or unique by the broad, target audience and is not considered by experts to be creative. Shows an inability to reflect on the quality of work. Displays a sophisticated level of openness and responsiveness to new and diverse perspectives; incorporates group input and feedback into the work.

Productively uses an impressive set of divergent thinking strategies to generate ideas. Products or performances include evidence of spontaneous fluency,. Demonstrates a high degree of adaptability in the production of creative products or performances e. Is the student curious, flexible, and open to ambiguity in exploring ideas?

Show perseverance? Dedicate enough time and effort to the creative process? Is the student curious, flexible and open to ambiguity in exploring ideas?

How to use critical thinking in the classroom

Introduction Assessing the 4Cs — critical thinking, communication, collaboration and creativity —. Not surprisingly, the creation of 4Cs rubrics has been a high priority for 21st century school and district leaders. After almost two years of thoughtful collaboration, these rubrics are now available in final form to not only EdLeader21 members, but to nonmember schools and districts as well. The 4Cs rubrics have been designed to support a mix of district-wide uses, including but not limited to capacity building, instructional planning, student assessment and teacher evaluation.

In it you will find in-depth examples from EdLeader21 member schools and districts, along with detailed guidance for using the rubrics in academic disciplines. What is the Purpose of the Rubrics? EdLeader21 member schools and districts have been clear in their request for 4Cs rubrics. The EdLeader21 4Cs rubrics support educators in integrating and assessing the 4Cs throughout their systems of teaching and learning. Users of the rubrics are encouraged to adapt them for such use. The rubrics are also available in Word format, for EdLeader21 members only.

Many subject matter experts in the field also provided helpful commentary and revisions see the end of this document for acknowledgments.

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Developing a Scoring Criteria (Rubrics)

For the rubrics to be a helpful resource in your school or district, it is important to determine exactly what role they should play in the teaching and learning system. Below are some common uses within EdLeader21 for your consideration. The most common use of the rubrics is to support educators in evaluating student work. By assessing the quality of products and performances using the rubrics, you can determine whether students have met your instructional goals in terms of the 4Cs.

It is important to tailor the rubric for the student performance being assessed. Adapt the language in the rubrics based on the subject area and the type of product assessed. These rubrics can be used to provide students with an opportunity to self-assess the quality of their work or how they displayed the dispositions captured in the rubrics.

Guide students to browse through their unit journal or portfolio of work to look for evidence that they met the rubric criteria. Instruct students to record notes on Post-it notes in places in which they find evidence. The rubrics can be used to guide the design of professional development outcomes. If students are to be evaluated on their acquisition of the 4Cs, educators will need support as they integrate 4Cs into instruction and assessment.

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Identify a single rubric and use it to design a specific, measurable, attainable, realistic, and time-bound professional development goal related to using the 4Cs in practice. The rubrics can be used to support effective 4Cs integration into units, lessons and assessments. Adopt a common curriculum design model that provides a frame for infusing the 4Cs into units.

Understanding by Design, Project Based Learning and International Baccalaureate IB are examples of curriculum design models that utilize a backwards design approach into which the 4Cs can be infused. Unit Sketch, a summary of the Operation Kidfit unit in the Additional Resources Document, illustrates how rubric content can be used to create a plan to teach and assess the 4Cs in a unit.

The rubrics can be used to communicate with stakeholders about 21st century student outcomes. TI P Create a messaging plan to introduce the rubrics to stakeholder groups and communicate plans for assessing the 4Cs. The rubrics can support authentic performance-based teacher evaluation processes. Their precision in defining student outcomes that matter can help district leaders design teacher evaluation systems that educators actually find meaningful and that support continuous improvement in instructional practices.

TIP Build a library of exemplars we suggest starting with exemplary student work related to teaching and assessing the 4Cs. Organize the exemplars by rubric category, using folders or tags. Use the title of the rubric row as a folder label or tag. The 4Cs—and these rubrics— are highly interconnected. For example, effective collaboration. Effective problem solving often requires teamwork and collaboration skills. Therefore, you will notice some natural overlap across rubrics. They should be seen as a holistic set of competencies. In the real world, the 4Cs are used in an integrated fashion.

We are called to use a variety of competencies in any problemsolving scenario. Therefore, educators should help students understand the connections between the 4Cs and how they are mutually supportive. TI P When selecting a 4Cs competency for the design of a unit, narrow the focus and be clear about what you plan to assess. It can become cumbersome for teachers to assess too many competencies.

In one unit, a teacher may elect to focus on a few aspects of Critical Thinking and Collaboration, for example. Clearly communicate the 4Cs focus to students at the launch of a unit and be prepared to discuss any areas of rubric overlap. The 4Cs should be taught within the context of academic content. Ideally, students should understand how these competencies are used in the world beyond the classroom by people who work in the field of study. The rubrics when adapted for their specific uses are applicable across all subject areas, from physical education to physics.

Set students up to engage in a learning process mirrored off of work that occurs in the real world.


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Scientists, Mathematicians, and Social Scientists all collaborate, problem solve, and share their findings with their professional communities. However, the way in which they approach investigations, the tools used for collaboration, and the format for communicating their findings varies based on the profession. There are discipline-specific expressions of the 4Cs that require a level of customization to the rubrics based on the subject area.

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When designing units, create authentic assessment opportunities in which students can simultaneously demonstrate mastery of content and your targeted 4Cs. The standards call for students to not only master content and basic skills, but to engage in analysis, research, and inquiry and to build communication, critical thinking, and problem-solving skills. The Common Core standards are a highly effective platform on which to build and expand your 4Cs work. However, it is important to consider the CCSS as the floor and not the ceiling when it comes to student achievement.

How can the EdLeader21 rubrics be used to support teachers in clarifying and addressing such gaps? Form a committee to engage in the process of aligning the rubrics to CCSS.

critical thinking rubrics high school Critical thinking rubrics high school
critical thinking rubrics high school Critical thinking rubrics high school
critical thinking rubrics high school Critical thinking rubrics high school
critical thinking rubrics high school Critical thinking rubrics high school
critical thinking rubrics high school Critical thinking rubrics high school
critical thinking rubrics high school Critical thinking rubrics high school

Related critical thinking rubrics high school



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